Editing Film Scans | Top Selling Items On Ebay

Editing Film Scans

November 10, 2016 - Comment

After many questions and requests for this one, it's finally here! I'm breaking down my workflow when editing film scans, why I edit them, and how important it is to communicate with your lab. Related

After many questions and requests for this one, it's finally here! I'm breaking down my workflow when editing film scans, why I edit them, and how important it is to communicate with your lab.

Comments

Mike Padua says:

This is great…and that Old Milwaukee hat!!!!!!!!

Tadeas Plachy says:

Editing my color scans was alway painfull for me, but now I see, there is
an easy way to do it. Maybe in spring I will shoot few rolls of color film.

Andrew Bacon says:

Thanks Matt. Have you done a video on your scanning process? I’m just about
to invest in a scanner and it would be helpful to see how you do it.

Stormblessed says:

He has several videos on that subject.

Jonathon Byson says:

King Tsz Chan just incase he doesn’t respond. I scan my film as well. For
my medium format film. 1200 dpi is about 4-5.5mb per image, and 2400 dpi is
slightly more than that at about 8-11mb.

VolaticusPrimus says:

Thanks Matt, this is the vid I have been waiting for,

Andrew Cenci says:

this is super helpful! Always thought film was supposed to stay film,
thanks for helping me understand the flexibility and control I have over
how scans are made.

David Witte says:

Aren’t you afraid of getting tonal breaks when increasing contrast on an
8-bit JPEG? I normally prefer to do all my editing with 16-bit TIFF files
so I don’t loose any tonality.

Lance Sherwood says:

Great video as always. Thanks Matt! Where do you fall in the Noritsu vs.
Frontier debate? I know you scan at home, but when you send stuff out what
do you prefer?

Thomas Prettyman says:

Matt – why receive scans in JPEG instead of TIFF? TIFF contain almost as
much data as a RAW, seems like that would be more useful for the workflow
you have.

Nathan Castellanos says:

Great to see. Have you ever tried using your dslr and a light box to scan
your negatives?

Most of the editing work there is in the histogram, but I really like
having the flexibility of the raw file to make edits. Also working on the
histograms for my negatives has made my digital photo processing sills a
lot better too.

Michel Oliveira says:

Matt, thank you so much for sharing this with us! It helped a lot!! cheers
man

Tobias Sundqvist says:

Great videos! This inspires me to get into film photography again. Thinking
of buying a 500cm, too bad they are so damn expensive

Marijn De Reuse says:

Would love to see you walk us trough your scanning process as well.

Blhdj Photography says:

Thanks for sharing your knowledge again. missed this kind of videos from
you

Omar Bueno says:

King Tsz Chan Same question here, i want to know too

Abdul Salam says:

glad to see you back for more useful information

Greg McKnight says:

Really needed some Matt Day in my life during these stressful times. Thanks
buddy.

King Tsz Chan says:

Usually how big is you file size of the scan image?

Timothy “makeups” Ditzler says:

Thanks Matt that helped a lot! Glad to see you back at making the vids!

Kristoffer Lislegaard says:

However if all you do is adjust where the white should be and the blacks I
guess the look is still in the film stock.

Patricio Isaías says:

You are my hero man! cheers from Chile (:

Kristoffer Lislegaard says:

Wow this is SO helpful and interesting. i was much more under the
impression that more of the lock was in the actual film stock.

Dennis halim says:

hey. that’s pretty good

Comments are disabled for this post.

Searching...